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    by Published on August 23rd, 2016 12:30 AM  Number of Views: 856 
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    The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt was released on the 19th of May 2015. It was one of the most awaited games of that year and managed to receive both critical and fan acclaim. It currently stands as the most awarded video game in history, as well as the highest rated game on the PC platform by user score.

    Developed by Poland-based studio, CD Projekt Red and using the IP of the Cult Classic Polish fantasy novels by Andrzej Sapkowski, the game is also an example of remediation in gaming which makes it all the more interesting. But is all of this praise and attention really deserved? Letís find out!


    Powered by the new REDengine 3 which was crafted from the bottom up to support open world games and run on 64-bit platforms with great multi-threaded support, at least visually Witcher 3 is one of the most impressive open world RPGs ever made.


    One of the most impressive things within Red Engine 3 is its ability to render gigantic worlds. With an impressive geometry draw distance and an excellent foliage and tree draw distance, it manages to feel vast. Smooth LOD transitions avoid the dithering effects that might be seen in other open world titles. Tweaking the ini files can push many of those aspects further (into the absurd, hardware destroying range) but honestly even without such tricks it looks and feels massive.

    One can see the towers of Novigrad, the game's biggest city, the ancient fortresses or mountains of Skellige from kilometers away. This adds to immersion and helps players understand their position within the world no matter where they are.

    Of particular note is just how complex the design can be. For example, the Cities in the game can have complex sewer system, a street level full of detail and AI simulation and still have many buildings with custom details and objects inside. All of this is done without loading screens or hitches. This is something few games have so far managed to do whilst keeping decent performance and it does feel awesome. Novigrad City itself is one of the crowning achievements of The Witcher 3, technologically speaking.


    The Foliage rendering system is also very complex. The huge amount of leaves, grass, trees and bushes is staggering. It really does remind you of Crysis in a sense. The distance at which trees and bushes can be seen is vast and tends to give the game a sense of scale as well s aid immersion.

    With that being said, often parts of the foliage may appear aliased or not as high quality as they could have otherwise been. Whilst the general quality is good, those inferior parts exist.

    Witcher 3 is a game with generally excellent texture work. On Ultra settings, 16x anisotropic filtering as well as high resolution mipmaps and textures are in use. Characters, terrain, most important to gameplay animals and many key items look exceptional. A lot of work was done to make sure the details most people would notice or look at would look amazing and it shows. Geralt and other main or important characters look amazing, easily some of the best in gaming. Meanwhile, even third tier random peasants and guards look quite good both in cutscenes and out. However ...
    by Published on July 21st, 2016 01:00 AM  Number of Views: 1006 
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    DOOM, also known as DOOM 4 or DOOM 2016, is a reboot of the classic FPS franchise developed by id Software. The months leading up to the game's release were filled with some dread and negativity as it's multiplayer beta was met with largely negative responses. Bethesda also did not release review copies for the game on time, something that made people question it's quality as well as the publisher's trust in their own product.

    Despite all that, on release it managed to turn around the expectations and is now generally considered to be a great game by both critics and fans alike. We have waited for 12 years to see this game... so is there merit to this impressive 180 in public opinion?Powered by the new id Tech 6, DOOM looks and performs amazingly. Id Software has really outdone themselves this time. Whilst the previous id tech 5 did perform quite well even on low end systems (after some patches and driver updates at least) it also suffered from a fairly flat and non-dynamic lighting system and noticeable texture pop-in. However, the new tech largely fixes all of these issues. It represents a truly massive overhaul of an ambitious but ultimately flawed game engine, with some lessons taken from their other masterpieces like id tech 4. DOOM certainly is built to impress.

    The game ...
    by Published on June 21st, 2016 12:00 AM  Number of Views: 1062 
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    Now time for a retro review! Return to Castle Wolfenstein was a game released in 2001 to great critical and fan acclaim for both its single-player and multi-player. The game is lauded as being the very best of the extremely long running Wolfenstein series and that says a lot considering the pedigree of the franchise. It's influence was felt throughout many newer titles, from Battlefield to Call of Duty, STALKER to Metro 2033.
    Was all of this fanfare warranted though?

    RTCW was a truly amazing visual spectacle way back in 2001. Running on a heavily modified Quake 3 engine and featuring high end features such as TruForm (tessellation), the game was a technological masterpiece for its time.

    It is an example of early realistic, muscle-based facial animation technology that also managed to operate on characters dynamically according to the situation (in a manner similar to the tech later used in HL2 and TF2) as well as some really interesting and intense atmospheric effects and details thrown into the world. For example, the ...
    by Published on May 27th, 2016 06:00 AM
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    One of the biggest tragedies in the video game industry is that most truly brilliant classics are not remade. Technology has advanced so much that many classics can now be fully realized on platforms like Unreal Engine 4, but such things are very rare. Thankfully one of the most beloved PC classics (originally released on Macintosh actually) has been remade, and that classic is Myst. In this article we will evaluate this remake, realMyst: Masterpiece Edition, and see how it fares not just as a remake but as a game itself in this modern era of gaming.



    Like the original, realMyst: Masterpiece Edition is a first-person puzzle adventure game taking place in a distinct fantasy setting. It is remade on a brand new 3D engine, while the original had pre-rendered environments and point-and-click movment. So by clicking, you'd teleport forward in the original. Nobody can truly prefer this original style, but regardless realMyst: Masterpiece Edition can be played in that style. Or it can be played as it should, as a 3D first-person ...
    by Published on April 8th, 2016 07:00 AM  Number of Views: 1388 
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    The horror video game genre has been revitalized in recent years and it now strongly populates Steam's indie game section. Even mainstream horror games are being released again, such as The Evil Within. We all see this, but how many of us wonder why? What caused this horror revolution? These horror games are quite a lot different than the classics like Resident Evil and Silent Hill.

    This revolution was sparked by Penumbra, a first-person PC exclusive episodic horror game released by Frictional Games in 2007 and 2008, and it is currently within our lists of top ten horror games of all time (where it's top 3) and top ten best stories of all time. It was the first game from Frictional Games, who later brought us Amnesia: The Dark Descent and SOMA (and no, they did NOT develop Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs). But Penumbra didn't directly cause this surge of new horror games, it indirectly sparked it. The game that directly resulted in the rebirth of horror video games was Amnesia: The Dark Descent, which uses the same formula as Penumbra.

    In this article we're going to review Penumbra in its entirety. That includes Penumbra: Overture (2007), Penumbra: Black Plague (2008), and Penumbra: Requiem (2008). We're going to look at what makes this game so special, why its formula is what revived the genre, and why Amnesia: The Dark Descent was the one that directly sparked this revolution instead of Penumbra. We're also going to score Penumbra relative to how we would have scored it in 2007-2008, although really the only score that is affected is Audio & Visuals since we have new ...
    by Published on March 25th, 2016 07:00 AM  Number of Views: 2788 
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    Another Friday, another article. Today we're looking back at a very special game, Neverwinter Nights 2: Complete, as we approach the ten year anniversary of its original release. This is a collection of a PC exclusive pause-and-play RPG and its three expansions, developed by Obsidian Entertainment, except for the final expansion Mysteries of Westgate which was developed by Ossian Studios. Neverwinter Nights 2 was released in 2006, its first expansion Mask of the Betrayer in 2007, its second expansion Storm of Zehir in 2008, and the aforementioned Mysteries of Westgate in 2009. Neverwinter Nights 2: Complete is available on GOG.com for only $19.99, and it often goes on sale for half that. That's quite the bargain for some of the highest quality RPGs out there with hundreds of hours of content even without mods.

    In hindsight, this game seems too good to be true. This isn't entirely because of our lowered standards, which are the result of industry standards lowering greatly since those times. Neverwinter Nights 2 was the culmination of traditional video game RPGs. Everything was building up to it. It features nearly every playable race, class, skill, and feat offered by prior D&D RPGs, and then many more on top of that. The amount of content offered by it and its predecessor, Neverwinter Nights, was staggering at the time of their release, and even more staggering by today's standards. And that was just the base games, not even including the expansions which added more races, classes, prestige classes, feats/abilities, spells, and more. Neverwinter Nights 2: Complete features 12 races with 17 sub-races, over 300 spells, well over 300 feats, 40 different weapon types (not individual weapons but types like longsword, war axe, shortbow, etc.), and much more.

    So in this article we're going to break down this gargantuan that is Neverwinter Nights 2, including all of its expansions. Yes, we're going to review all of them, something we wish we had the opportunity to do. Although for what it's worth, Neverwinter Nights 2: Mysteries of Westgate released about one month after GND-Tech was created. That was when we weren't yet reviewing video games, and we weren't even called GND-Tech yet!




    Since we are essentially reviewing four games in one article, we are using a different layout this time around. Gameplay is first and foremost because Neverwinter Nights 2 and its expansions obviously share the same basic gameplay. There are some exceptions in each, but those are discussed on the pages for each individual campaign.

    At its core, Neverwinter Nights 2 is a tactical stat-based pause-and-play RPG built upon Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 which is its foundation. Most things like attacks in combat (chance to hit), damage given, damage taken, almost everything is determined by a dice roll which happens in the background. Combat is partially turn-based; not fully like the classic Fallout games or XCOM, but more on an individual basis. When characters are engaged in combat, turns are in play just like a tabletop RPG in which players take turn rolling dice. Here in Neverwinter Nights 2 the turn-based mechanic is much more seamless than a full fledge turn-based game, you have no controls over the turns and a turn only lasts mere seconds. It's like Pillars of Eternity and the Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic games but slightly slower.

    By having a stat for so many different things, Neverwinter Nights 2 simulates more aspects than other games, making it seem far more realistic and far more logical than other video games. That's the whole point of the original pen and paper Dungeons & Dragons after all; to role-play, to pretend to live a different life, so in order for it to believable it has to be realistic and account for many different things, hence the different attributes, saving throws, abundance of skills, and how they're all tied together. Role-playing games are meant to simulate an actual life to some degree, and both Neverwinter Nights games go farther than any other video game.

    Keep in mind that Neverwinter Nights 2 is one of few games with an almost perfectly balanced difficulty setting, one that doesn't skew the stats/rules in anyone's favor. That difficulty is called "Hardcore D&D Rules" and it's highly encouraged to play only on this mode and disregard the others.

    Neverwinter Nights 2 is one of few RPGs with both third-person and isometric camera options. In fact, the camera is completely and totally customizable. You can use third person at essentially whatever distance you want, isometric with any distance you want, and whatever camera controls you desire. You see, Neverwinter Nights 2 is a true PC game with an insane amount of customization made back during the days when PC games were designed to take advantage of mouse, keyboard, and higher IQ and attention span. You won't find an RPG with this much customization and configuration anymore.

    It is not an action game. WASD movement is supported but it's like Dragon Age and Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, so A and D rotate both the character and the camera in an ideal configuration (it isn't like this by default). The game relies heavily on mouse interaction, as it's a point-and-click game like every pause-and-play and turn-based RPG. All object interaction is point-and-click, although movement can be either point-and-click ...
    by Published on February 18th, 2016 05:00 AM
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    It's been over two years since we last reviewed a QPAD product, and more than 5 years since we reviewed their QPAD 5K as part of our Gaming Mice Mega Test where it took home the prize for being the most comfortable mouse! Now we're back with the QPAD 8K which continues with their iconic palm grip design. Available for £59.99 the 8K has a laser sensor which a maximum DPI of 8200 and 7 programmable buttons, of which 2 are to change ...
    by Published on February 5th, 2016 08:00 AM  Number of Views: 1463 
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    Time for another Flashback Friday article. We created these types of articles in order to write about things we never got a chance to before, like our upcoming Game of the Decade article, or reviews of games that were released before GND-Tech was around. In this article we bring you a review of a hidden gem, Cryostasis: Sleep of Reason. It is a psychological horror game developed by Action Forms, published by 1C Company, Aspyr, and others, and released exclusively for PC in 2009. It was also a nominee for Dark Horse of the Decade in our aforementioned Game of the Decade article, it won Best Sound Effects of the Decade, and it has earned an entry in our ten best stories in video games article.

    In our Flashback Friday reviews like this one, we score its graphics quality with regard to its time period in order to make it more fair. So keep this in mind! Continue to the next page for the review.



    Once upon a time, Cryostasis: Sleep of Reason was actually well known. It was marketed heavily by NVIDIA for its use of NVIDIA's PhysX engine (originally AGEIA PhysX before NVIDIA acquired and expanded upon it). It was also promoted ...

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