• Cooling

    by Published on November 25th, 2017 06:00 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cases,
    3. Cooling
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    Functional mid tower cases appear to be making a come back in recent years. In the past, if you wanted to run at least a dual GPU setup, with liquid cooling options, a full tower ATX case was a must. However, now everyone wants the biggest and most spacious case out there. Some are limited by desk placement and storage, others prefer a smaller, more compact gaming tower that can fit all of their hardware comfortably while providing room to expand if needed. Lately manufacturers like Cooler Master have grown to fill this market by releasing functional mid-tower ATX cases that have more than enough internal space to fit all your GPUs in a much smaller size.



    Introducing the MasterBox MB600L by Cooler Master (MCB-B600L-KA5N-S00). The MasterBox lineup features affordable mid-tower PC cases that are able to keep up with the demand of the typical gamer. In this review we will be looking at the MB600L which offers a very unique interior design and a sleek and simple exterior design. We will be taking a look at how the case is packaged, its many features, assembly and its overall design ...
    by Published on July 9th, 2017 04:00 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Processors,
    3. Graphics Cards,
    4. Power Supplies,
    5. Motherboards,
    6. Cases,
    7. Memory,
    8. Technology,
    9. Gaming,
    10. Hard Drives,
    11. Cooling
    Article Preview


    It is time for our yearly gaming PC building guide! This time we have numerous categories based on budget. For each PC build we exclude operating system, peripherals, and display, since those are all things you may or may not have already plus not every operating system choice costs money (Linux distros).

    Our choices are by no means the only ones, but these featured PC builds will help get anyone started. We are using Newegg as our point of reference since they charge no taxes for most states. Prices fluctuate of course, so our listed prices are not necessarily final.

    Right now, GPU prices have skyrocketed once again due to demand for cryptocurrency mining. Because of this, we have omitted ...
    by Published on November 7th, 2016 12:10 PM  Number of Views: 1821 
    1. Categories:
    2. Processors,
    3. Graphics Cards,
    4. Power Supplies,
    5. Motherboards,
    6. Cases,
    7. Memory,
    8. Gaming,
    9. Hard Drives,
    10. Cooling
    Article Preview


    Hello everyone, today we present you with a new type of article here at GND-Tech. We're debuting the first of a series of Build Recommendations that we plan on updating every few months or so to keep up with the ever increasing pace of new technology and hardware.

    We're breaking the series down into four categories. The categories are Budget, Mid-Range, High End and Infinite Budget. Keep in mind, we are not sponsored so there is no bias to be found here, but that unfortunately means we cannot afford to actually buy all these components and ...
    by Published on June 4th, 2013 10:34 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cooling
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    It seems that All In One (AIO) CPU coolers are booming in popularity these days. In the wake of this boom, Cooler Master has just released a whole new lineup of these coolers into the mix. The Seidon series of AIO coolers comes in three flavors: the 120M, 120XL and the 240M. The main difference between the coolers appears to be based solely on the size or thickness of the radiator. The number (240 or 120) signifies the length of the radiator based on how many 120mm fans that can be mounted on a single side. In this review we will be looking at the 240M which is the largest of the series.


    This particular model features a 240mm radiator allowing for a total of four (two included) 120mm fans to be installed. The pump/water block combo is solid copper with fine mesh like micro channels which greatly maximize surface area. This in turn should add a whole extra layer of performance when comparing them to other models. On paper, this seems like a pretty decent AIO cooler! Time to see how it performs, but first, let's take a look at some specs.





    Below are a list of detailed specifications provided by
    Cooler Master.


    • Factory filled with coolant, then sealed and pressure tested - requires zero maintenance for years.
    • Waterblock made with UltraFine Micro
    ...
    by Published on August 27th, 2012 11:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cooling
    Article Preview

    Thermaltake has been in the water cooling business for quite some time now beginning with their Big Water series 8 years ago back in 2004. Today Thermaltake is still at it with their new Water 2.0 series, a completely redesigned all-in-one (AIO) CPU liquid cooling solution. The series includes three models ranging in performance: the Performer, Pro and Extreme. In this review we will be looking at the Performer which is the smallest out of the group. Though it's the last in line of the series, we expect to see some pretty decent numbers considering that this is still a water cooling system.



    In a nutshell, this cooler features a 120mm radiator attached to a pump mounted directly to the CPU water block. Thermaltake has included two 120mm fans which allow you to use the push-pull method to get the lowest temps possible. Currently you can pick this cooler up for $64.95. Not a bad price for an all in one water cooler. But keep on reading.... more details on the next page!




    Feature-wise, the Thermaltake Water 2.0 Performer ...
    by Published on August 8th, 2012 09:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cooling
    Article Preview



    We have seen quite a few different versions of the Frio lineup from Thermaltake, but of all the different versions, usually the one that attracts the most attention is the largest. The Frio Extreme (P/N: CLP0587) is the largest of the Frio series and according to Thermaltake, this cooler should have no problem cooling up to 250W of CPU TDP. Quite a claim, but we'll see how this thing tests before we make any comment on performance. Given its size and design, we would expect this to be a very effective cooler all around.

    At a glance, this cooler features two 140x25mm fans which cool a dual tower style heatsink. The heatsink consists of six evenly spaced 6mm u-shaped heat pipes for maximum heat dispersal. Probably the most note worthy addition to the Frio Extreme is the included 10-year that covers the entire heat sink including ...
    by Published on July 16th, 2012 12:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cooling
    Article Preview


    Well my good readers, in the midst of all this heat it looks like another CPU cooler has landed in front of me. This time its from a slightly less known brand, Spire, and we're looking at their TME III CPU cooler. TME is short for TherMax Eclipse, for those who don't know. This is a large CPU heat sink designed for enthusiasts and overclockers. Lets see if this one stands out from the crowd.



    • Five (5) 8mm all copper U-shaped sinter-powder heat-pipes
    • Solid copper base in direct contact with all of the processor area
    • Straight lined heat-pipes allowing air to easily pass through
    • Stamped aluminum wide fins for best surface rate
    • Dimpled surface fin for increased heat transfer rate
    • All black-Nickel coated heat-pipes to preserve killer looks from
    ...
    by Published on June 14th, 2012 10:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cooling
    Article Preview

    Recently Thermaltake has released a brand new lineup of CPU coolers dubbed the Frio Series ranging in performance. The Frio Advanced, which we will be reviewing today, is on the lesser end of the Frio series, but from the looks of things, it looks like it should pack a pretty good punch in the high end CPU cooler world. Some of the highlights are the dual push-pull 130mm fans each rated at 88.77 CFM. The five 6mm copper heat pipes are DTH (Direct Touch Heatpipe) technology which we will get to later on in the review.



    According to Thermaltake, The Frio Advanced is capable of cooling 230W of CPU power which is 10W higher than the original Frio cooler. However, 230W is quite the claim. On paper this looks like a pretty nice cooler, but lets see how it does in real world conditions.



    Like mentioned on the previous page, on paper, the Frio Advanced looks like it should have no trouble handling anything you could throw at it. Rated at 230W, keeping an overclocked CPU cool "should" be no problem for this cooler.

    Below are a list of features and specifications provided directly from Thermaltake.

    Heat-pipe Direct Touch Technology, Supports 230W Cooling Performance


    • 5 x 6 mm heat-pipes direct touch CPU surface increasing
    ...
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